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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
that is -- but i pray that is not true. i pray that is not true. i pray my junior colleague from virginia is correct when he says the one thing we cannot allow to change are the values upon which this couny is built. for if that were to occur, then they would be able to declare victory. genuine victory. i predict to you that one thing has chand, though, i respectfully suggest that the way of life of present and future terrorists has changed forever. thfuture of organized terrorist cellis abt to welcome the 21st century in a way th they never anticipate anticipated. for in this dastardly act they may have done what no other group of people could possibly have done, and that is unite the civilized world, unite our allies in europe who share our values, unite our russian friends, our chinese friends, unite the world. because that image of that plane smashing into the second to you we're has reverberated around the world, and every leader in every country can picture the same thing happening there their nation. i recently visited china with three of my colleagues. there are buildings in china
to falls church, virginia to hear from several people about the healthcare law. several provisions took place thursday to allow children up to age 26 to stay on their parent's plan. this is about 50 minutes. >> how are you? take off your jacket here. >> welcome to our backyard. we tried clean you everything. watch your step. 36 years ago, i was born with severe 9 defin yen si. it's been a bit of a challenge over the years. in 2006, i reached a lifetime cap after three years. i was trying to figure out what i should do, go on a disability policy, change jobs, fortunately, my employer came threw and was able to cover my costs. we had an opportunity to have this employer take occur of us. 90% of the costs deal with the clotting factor and the medications i take. that's really where i drive up healthcare it is important to have a policy that will cover that. . >> for people who are here. first of all, i have the second of health and human services. she's charged with implementing. former insurance commissioner. snows all about this stuff. we are glad to have her on the team. somebody who he
, there will be defined benefits. you could look at north carolina and norfolk south, virginia and csx. there are many other states where we don't have progress. irnl one or both of you want to terry briefly and then get back to my main interest which is captive shipper rates >> they really get lost in all of this. one of the things troubling is the massive use of stock repurchases. i think one would have to look at a balance you say, well, people have a right to reward their share holders. they are encouraged in people to invest. along with that is the whole question of capital shipments. that's really why we are here. i would like to hear from you, a sense of your path to fairness of the captive. shippers come to see me all the time. they come from all over the koirpt country. i'm not a lawyer but i feel like one when i think of all the cases brought before the itc or stb and feeling short changed. they are always up against you can win or loose because you have a system. you sort of discuss the release in some of these papers i am reading but it is a case of timing. the classic technique is to stal
were wrong in massachusetts and virginia and new jersey and delaware and alaska and kentucky. so i don't know who organizes the efforts that is needed to put obsessive partisanship aside when it gets in the way of doing what's right for the american people. and those internal power struggles that need to be set aside for the good of the order. but if i were king, more like it, if i were a coach, if i were a coach writing, i would say, look, everyone has constructive roles in this, the needs are great heading into the midterm elections because the cause is so great. the cause, the great awakening of america, and the need, truth in america, how do we get out there? how do we get the message out there to the voters? practical ways. one, we got to raise funds, got to knock on doors. we've got to hold the press accountable when you know they're making things up and telling untruths. we've got to do this together. and by the way, i am a proponent of freedom in the press in this country. our young men and women in uniform, willing to fight and die for our constitutional rights, including that
with us today. they lived in west virginia. this military family loves the marine corps and counted a blessing to have live throughout the united states. as you know, general amos is held the title of assistant commandant for the marine corps for the past two years. today we consider his nomination to be commandant, to lead a force of 250,000 active duty and 39,000 reserve marines serving on the frontiers of freedom, fighting in afghanistan, providing humanitarian relief to flood-ravaged pakistan, and practices -- rescuing vessels from pirates off the coast of somalia. join in 19 -- one in a 1946, his father received his wings flying seaplanes. eupepsia most distinguished officer before you here today. i will have you noted growing up with a father who was a navy pilot saw general amos living in memory -- many warm localities, california, florida, and the british west indies. his guidance counselor once wrote his parents that he feared that the general was "destined for a light as a beach bum if he did not turn things around." obviously he did turn things around. he graduated in hig
found out is if there is interfaith multi- cultural peace movements not just in northern virginia and washington, d.c., but they are in israel, palestine, jerusalem, no mention of these organizations, why do think that is so? i am jewish but i'm not a billionaire. if you look at the press, all jewish people are all rich. this stereotype goes on with african-americans and lots of different minorities. how do we change these images so that america changes as the images change? >> two points on that. i wanted to speak to two issues. first, the nature of the media is the only cover conflict. moderation and bridge building is not newsworthy. it does not make the news when we get 10,000 people live in chicago at our annual convention. we bring government and all sorts of civic leaders and we talk about how we, as americans, from all different faith backgrounds are working together for justice, are working together against a the kind of extremism. we're working together for peace and security for people in the middle east. it just does not make news. unless there is a conflict, and if yo
, virginia, et the pentagon. president obama and robert gates attended the sort -- the ceremony ended remarks for about 40 minutes. -- and dave remarks for about 40 minutes. >> ladies and gentleman, the national anthem of the united states. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> listen gentleman, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. >> mr. president, secretary gates, distinguished guests, and most of all, families and friends of those we lost on 9/11 -- inside of the pentagon buys a quilt on display, stitched together by thousands of america -- of americans who wanted us to know that they would remember those who did not survive. on the quilt are written the words by a little girl -- in our hearts we weep for you, in our minds, we honor you. today, her words still comfort us. today, we still weep for those we lost here in new york -- here, in new york, and in somerset county. today, we still honor them with our presence, and certainly with this memorial. mostly, we honor them with our lives. it is what we have done from that day until this, the secretary at -- the sacrifices we have borne, the laughter we
master's from virginia polytechnic institute. she holds a ph.d. from the university of north carolina, chapel hill. in 2000, she was awarded an m.l.s. from yale law school. she specializes in that race relations and is the author of several books, including her most recent, "debating immigration." next, i would like to introduce phil glaze, a third-generation fruit grower and former chairman of the apples association. he serves the interests of the entire american apple industry. he is an active member of the coalition for immigration reform. his family business grows, packs and ships apples, and has been producing apples since the 1920's. it is my pleasure to introduce our third witness, arturo rodri giez. since 1993, he has served as the president of the united farm workers, note first founded by cesar chavez. he holds a master's degree in social work from the university of michigan and has worked for the usw since 1973. he has oliver -- he has over 35 years of experience organizing former erskine negotiating contracts, and working for -- organizing farm workers, negotiating contrac
colleague, bob goodlap from virginia. we'll be joined during the trial by our colleagues, hank johnson, jim, and zo lofgren. we're also assisted by alan barron, mark, harry and kirsten. at the outset, the house recognizes what an extraordinary proceeding this is and how seldom an impeachment is undertaken. i think this is a reflection of several thing not the least of which the caliber of the men and women who are nominated for the federal bench, the vast majority of which who are acquitted themselves with great distinction and not given cause for their removal from office. i think it's also a tribute to the confirmation process that does a good job in vetting out those who are not suitable for the bench. and i also think it's a reflection of how infrequently the house believes this extraordinary remedy is required. i won't spend much timehis morning in discussing the standard for impeachment, the content of high crimes and misdemeanors. there'll be time for that later. more than that, i think the members of this committee understand that standard probably better than i or anyone else could
that chinese currency is undervalued. it is a problem. it affect it is ohio virginia. it's a source of great frustration for many years i've experienced in manufacturing. and where people disagree is how we should respond. and there's a number of paths. certainly the ryan-murphy bill is one approach. there are other that is are offered. how effective do you think unilateral u.s. action would be such as tear yiffs in enforcing the chinese to appreciate their currency? particularly considering some of the wto conversations? >> i think for any action to be effective it has to be able to withstand challenge. that doesn't mean we have no independent capacity to act. there are tools we have that are fully consistent with the wto. and our agreements with china. and i think that where those tools can be effective, we should be prepared to use them as we are. the critical test is whether they can withstand challenge. and there are a range of things we have the capacity to do that meet that test. as i mentioned in my testimony. >> thank you. and finally, the one thing that i noticed from quiet diploma
a number of international conferences that we found it at the university of iowa. the virginia tech research, and the second international conference on driver distraction and attention. the scientific community is really getting much more diverse in this topic, as well as repoed on these for many different conferences as well. when you start to take a look at the kinds of tools that will use in research, those are also devolving our jobs as scientists is really to paint a picture, sometimes it is clear what the picture is made up, other times it is very fuzzy. we have very tightly controlled laboratory research from scanners that can tell us exactly how the brain changes under different kinds of attention demand. we use simulators with the national advance driving simulator. we use field experiments. finally, crashed in epidemiology data to understand how these kinds of mechanisms work. along this continuant we have the basic research that has experimental control where we can ask very specific questions and get fairly unambiguous results to understand the underlying mechanisms. as
is one and virginia is one where the stock of unauthorized immigrants has come down and the past year. host: i want to ask you first, how do you come up with your terminology? like unauthorized immigrants. you hear a lot of different labeling with this issue. guest: the pew hispanice center as part of the pew research center. we don't have a dog in any fight. we are nonpartisan. if you choose what label or another, you are seen as being on one side of the issue or the other. we are not on any side. we chose the term the government uses. whetr it works for some people or does not, it is the closest thing, we think, to the initial term. ho: how did you do this study? how you calculate it is coming in and he is leaving? guest: i urge your viewers to go to our website. it includes a seven-page methodology section that describes how we do it. i will try to give you a brief summary. our website is www.pewhispanic.org. does is iswho rey purcell. he worked for the census bureau of some 20 years ago. he has been with us for the last five years. he is the originator of this methodology. it is c
virginia. okay? i should also say everybody involved in this story was republican. [laughter] including the role of charlie had like the president a white mother and a black father. the father was a republican appointed judge. but anyway i think we have made enormous progress. so the question is why does it still affect? do white parents secretly droll the shades and instruct their children this is the way you should think about black people? they are really not the same as we are? is that what happens? i don't think so. to the extent that we still have prejudice, it is said by phone third problem which is racial disparities. you know, we have disparities in crime, in poverty, education and it's unfortunate people do make generalizations based on that. they don't need anybody to tell them that this or that group has a high rate of crime. jesse jackson, you know, the famous story, admitted when he is walking down a dark street and you're behind him and he sees a couple of white kids and black kids he seems relieved. i think these disparities are part of the remaining problem that has to
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)